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Carrots

Carrots

The carrot domesticated in Central Asia in early history and was first cultivated in Afghanistan region approximately 1100 years ago.  Home of carrots and its numerous cousins can be tracked to dry and hot lands of ancient Persia and Afghanistan.  Earliest evidence of its use there was dated to 3000 BC.

Carrots were popular during ancient times from Ancient Egypt where they were placed in tombs of dead Pharaohs’ you can also find paintings of carrots and their harvest in hieroglyph.  The most popular colour of carrots was purple and cultivated in Egypt and used for medicinal purposes. The medicinal use of carrots moved from Egypt to Greece where they were bitter and hard to eat so they were used as a healing remedy for illnesses and used as a sexual aphrodisiac. Romans used to boil carrots and eat with live dressing and various herbs. American cuisine did not include carrot because it was only accepted after the World War I when soldiers returned home from war.

It is a widely used root vegetable (usually orange in colour) around the world because it contains high nutrition value, presence of B-carotene, dietary fibre, antioxidants, minerals, flexibility for processing in many kinds of ways and remains edible even after months of reliable storing in both ordinary or refrigerated places. Carrots are a good source of vitamin

A, rich in antioxidants, good for eyes, promotes glowing skin, boosts immune system and improve digestion.

Researchers of Stanford University in California report in the journal Human Genetics on a study that people with certain typical genetic variations, high blood levels of beta-carotene, which body transforms into the form of vitamin A, could possibly reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes.
You can enjoy the benefits of carrots in our OrganicKamdali Minestrone and Carrot soup with Coconut Milk.

You can enjoy the benefits of carrots in our OrganicKamdali Minestrone and Carrot soup with Coconut Milk.