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Beans

Beans

Beans is one of the earliest cultivated plants and the only proof provided that we used beans for food is 9,000 years old found in Thailand. In Afghanistan and Himalayan foothills, beans were found in the tombs of the kings of ancient Egypt where they were left as food for the dead and their souls in the afterlife. Beans were first cultivated in Aegean, Iberia and Europe. The oldest-known domesticated beans in the Americas were found in Guitarrero Cave, an archaeological site in Peru, and dated to around the second millennium BCE. However, genetic analyses of the common bean Phaseolus shows that it originated in Mesoamerica, and subsequently spread southward, along with maize and squash, traditional companion crops. The New World, many tribes would grow beans together with maize (corn), at squash. The corn would not be planted in rows as is done by European agriculture, but in a checkerboard/hex fashion across a field, in separate patches of one to six stalks each.  Preliminary studies have indicated ancient.

Indian diet back to the beans, corn, grains, greens and other low-fat, high-fibre plant foods that their ancestors depended upon can normalize blood sugar, suppress between-meal hunger and probably also foster weight loss.

Beans contribute a number of important micronutrients to diets; they are a great source of fibre. Beans (often referred to as grain legumes) contribute to some of the health benefits associated with plant-based diets. Beans are rich in a number of important micronutrients, including potassium, magnesium, folate, iron, and zinc, and are important sources of protein in vegetarian diets.